Some tribal traditions say that Rakataura built an altar tuahu at Maketu on the summit of the small hill behind the existing marae buildings before he'and Hoturoa met up again; others assert that Hoturoa built the altar there immediately after Tainui was beached. Whatever tradition is accepted, the altar at Maketu, called Te Ahurei, remains as one of the most important wahi tapu of the Tainui people, as it was here that Hoturoa, Rakataura and the others gave thanks for the completion of the arduous voyage from Hawaiiki, and sought supernatural sanction for their intended settlement.

The tuahu at Te Ahurei is not just one of many such altars constructed and used for sacred ceremonies by the tohunga on their first arrival, but is the pre-eminent tuahu, where the divination and other mystic rites were performed and which symbolised the completion of the voyage of Tainui from Hawaiiki and the permanent settlement of its people at Kawhia. There was little doubt that the traditions of learning needed to be continued, and a learning centre re-established as soon as possible after their settlement.

Many of the sacred artifacts brought to Aotearoa on Tainui were reposited at Te Ahurei. Later, other whare wananga of the Tainui tradition were established at Whatawhata and Piopio.

Of course the importance of Ahurei was not lost on succeeding generations of Tainui descendants. As a consequence of there being a whare wananga at Maketu, Ahurei continued as the site of the most sacred ceremonies associated with the search for and transmission of knowledge. At the foot of the hillock Ahurei, and immediately to the south and behind the marae buildings is the spot which is named Te Tumu of Tainui the mooring place of Tainui.

According to tradition, it was here that the Tainui canoe was hauled ashore at the end of its voyage from Hawaiiki, and where tribal historians assert the canoe still rests. The spot was marked by two limestone pillars which were placed there by Hoturoa and Rakataura at the earliest settlement date.

It is said to have been placed there by Rakataura and represented virility as the warrior spirit god who figured in the creation story of the Tainui Whare wananga.

Marking the stern of the canoe, Hoturoa placed the symbol of Puna, the spirit-goddess of that creation story. In full it is named Puna-whakatupu-tangata, and represents female fertility, the spring or source of humanity. A bilingual collection, in 67 chapters, of the histories, genealogies, songs and chants of the Tainui people, it represents the culmination of a life's work by the scholar and historian Dr Pei Te Hurinui Jones.

Te To O Tainui

His beautiful Maori text is matched on facing pages by Dr Bruce Biggs's English translations, a layout which facilitates a close study of the Maori language, valuable for scholars and students alike.

Genealogical tables and map references place each separate incident in its social and geographical context. Extensive footnotes provide further information and there is a complete index to all place names and personal names in the text. Order Nga iwi O Tainui Book.Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this WorldCat. Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours. Finding libraries that hold this item You may have already requested this item.

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Ka oti au i a Pikiao na te mea he uri ia a Tama te Kapua. Koina ona tupuna matua engari ko te Arikinuitanga o Waikato ka puta mai i te taha o te wahine a Hekemaru, ko Heke i te rangi. Pikiao m marries Rereiao f a decendent of Whatihua brother of Turongo. Whatihua marries Ruaputahanga Aotea waka and has Uenuku-te-rangi-huka m and Rereiao is a direct decendent born four generation later and marries Pikiao.

Whatihuas second wife is Apakura aye Tane. Heke-i-te-Rangi granddaughter of Huiao m and Waiturutu. Huiao and Waituturu has Kahu-tara-moa f. Kahu-tara-moa marries Tumanawahoe a direct decendent from Kokako.

Heke-i-te-Rangi was a nice to Tuirirangi m. Mauri ora ki a koutou katoa, a, nga mihi hoki mo nga korero kua whiriwhiria nei e koutou. Thumbs up to sharee for posting the topic and to u all for responding so passionately. It certainly has been a most interesting and entertaining 6 pages Ahakoa te rereketanga o nga whakahoki o tena, o tena, kua puta pai nga hua hei akiaki i te hinengaro, a, i te whatumanawa hoki.

Tena koutou katoa. I tae tuarua mai toku waka Tainui ki Kawhia, to muri mai i a Aotea Waka. Ko Turi-he-patea-taipo-moana te tohunga i whaka-awhiawhia taua takiwa, a, ka huaina ko 'ka-awhia' no reira tena koutou Aotea waka.

Re:Rakataura and Hoturoa Hoturoa needed Rakataura to help him establish Te Ahurei at Maketu and other tuahu like the one at Moe-a-toa. Te Punga o Tainui ki Mokau: He mauri ika hoki te punga o Tainui, koia ra te take i waiho paitia te punga ki reira Aotea waka was eventually submerged in Aotea Harbour hence its name.

By the time Tainui waka arrived at Kawhia, Turi ma had already left going overland along the coast to Taranaki, naming places as they went.

Waka abandoned cos someone mimi in it aue taukuri e!!!. Mimi refers to a place south of Mohakatino This version speaks of Kopuwai of Tainui waka who later became Tara-pounamu borrowing the waka to journey south again toward Taranaki.

He left the waka at Te Wai-iti after taking up residence with his Taranaki bride Hine-moana-te-waiwai There appears to be some confusion between Te Kingitanga whakapapa and Tainui whakapapa. Unfortunately it is a shared confusion influenced by inter-generational mis-understanding from some very deliberate misinformationWhen the Tainui waka canoe reached Aotearoa, its first landfall was at Whangaparaoa, at the eastern end of the Bay of Plenty.

Geneological traditions tell us that some of the company stayed behind in the Bay of Plenty, at both Whangaparaoa and further west at Torere, but the majority continued westward to Coromandel where one of the sails was left at Whitianga.

Eventually they entered the Hauraki gulf and the Waitemata, where some others left the Tainui waka - canoe and settled on the narrow isthmus which later became known as Tamaki-makaurau.

te punga o tainui

At each resting place altars were constructed and prayers offered-up for a continuation of their well-being. At Tamaki, the Tainui waka was dragged over the narrow portage between the Waitemata and the Manuka Manukau harbours. It is said that the priest Rakataura also called Rakaiuru in the company of other tohunga left Tainui and proceeded southwards through the forestlands by foot.

Still, the majority of the company was aboard when Tainui cleared the Manuka heads and sailed along the boisterous west coast of the island, which is still referred to today as the Tai Tamatane. At first, the Tainui waka sailed north into the Kaipara harbour and then beyond it, but then turned south and explored the coast to the south of Manuka. Initially they sailed past the Waikato heads and the three harbours, Whaingaroa, Aotea and Kawhia, eventually making landfall at Mimi, in North Taranaki, where Hoturoa planted a pohutukawa tree which he had transported from the east coast the Tai Tamawahine.

Turning northwards again, Hoturoa navigated the Tainui waka canoe to Mokau, where it was hauled ashore and secured to three posts. According to oral traditions recorded by Kelly, the ship's company left Tainui at Mokau and travelled northwards to Kawhia where Hoturoa and Rakataura were able to reconcile their differences.

The Tainui waka was launched again at Mokau, where its anchor-stone was left, and it was sailed back up the coast to Kawhia, where, at Maketu, it was finally hauled ashore to rest. The extent of these early excursions established the boundaries of the territory claimed by Tainui, and still recognised by all the other tribes today.

When the Tainui waka canoe arrived at Kawhia the first concern of Hoturoa appears to have been the establishment of a whare wananga, a school of learning, at Ahurei. It must have been clear to him that as his crew would become tribal leaders in the new colony, they and their children should be instructed in the culture and priestly skills which gave them authority over the common people.

te punga o tainui

His second concern was undoubtedly the establishment of the seed stocks of kumara, hue and taro which had been brought from Rangiatea. This was of tremendous significance to.

It meant that they could settle in established communities based on a regular production of staple food and could make adequate provision for defence and for the development and preservation of a dominant culture. The care of the gardens was traditionally the responsibility of the women of the family and his principal wife Whakaotirangi applied herself to the task in the new land.

When the time came for the crops to be blessed and protected against malign influences she sent for Hoturoa to perform the 'pure' ceremony.

The spirit of exploration however still burned strongly in some of his crew, who had taken more than twenty five young women as wives from among the original inhabitants, the Ngati Hikawai and Ngati Upokotioa people. One of the Tainui waka crew was Kopuwai and he took to wife Hine-moana-te-wai-wai, probably upon the slaying of her husband, Tamawhare. Tarapounamu and his friends accordingly set off in Tainui and finally put into Mokau where they decided to settle, returning to Kawhia to bring women and children to the new home.

When news reached Hoturoa that the Tainui waka had been hauled ashore at Mokau and left exposed to the elements he sent some of the remainder of his crew to bring the vessel to Kawhia, where he directed that she be drawn ashore into the shelter of a grove of kanuka at Maketu.

She was probably further protected against the elements by being banked with earth. Maori War Canoe. A bilingual collection, in 67 chapters, of the histories, genealogies, songs and chants of the Tainui people, it represents the culmination of a life's work by the scholar and historian Dr Pei Te Hurinui Jones. His beautiful Maori text is matched on facing pages by Dr Bruce Biggs's English translations, a layout which facilitates a close study of the Maori language, valuable for scholars and students alike.

Genealogical tables and map references place each separate incident in its social and geographical context. Extensive footnotes provide further information and there is a complete index to all place names and personal names in the text. Order Nga iwi O Tainui Book.Ms Dewes, a champion in the revitalisation of Maori culture and language, accompanied children from Ruamata School up Mount Ngongotaha last Friday to greet Matariki at dawn.

Matariki, also known as the traditional Maori New Year, is the name given by Maori, native to New Zealand, to the Pleiades, a small cluster of stars in the Taurus constellation, also known as the Seven Sisters in Greek legend. It is a special moment in the traditional Maori calendar when families gathered together to give thanks to the land, sea and sky, in celebration of the abundance of food gathered over the harvesting season.

The practice of observing rituals around Matariki dwindled in the early s, but has again regained prominence as part of the revival of Maori culture. But, the welcoming ceremony powhiri is always performed at traditional Maori gatherings preserved for sacred occasions. However, in this instance the ceremony is performed wherever Matariki is observed. And then there would be hangi, a ceremonial banquet to treat guest with the finest foodsโ€”the fruits of Matariki. During the powhiri, visitors are invited to bring their ancestors and those recently passed so they can be mourned.

Listening to mihimihi greetings and introductions -one child speaks for each family group whanau. The Matariki cluster is acknowledged by nearly all cultures including Aboriginal, Japanese, American Indian, Chinese and Greeks and Polynesian for centuries.

The tiny constellation, which has two meanings in Maori โ€” Mata Riki tiny eyes or Mata Ariki Eyes of God โ€” can be seen in the open sky with the naked eye.

Other iwi observe rituals around different sacred stars. Matariki has also been incorporated into the coat of arms of Royal House of Potatau, the house of the Maori king. Mr Puke has watched the revival of Matariki with a little regret. Ceremonial rituals around fishing, harvesting and planting which are the most important have been retained. It would honour the navigational expertise of the ancient Polynesian navigators who arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand from central Polynesia after circumnavigating the Pacific over years ago, says Mr Puke.

This year, the festivities and celebrations for Matariki take place from June 4 through to July 4. Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Email. Matariki Shines Over New Zealand. July 1, Updated: July 17, Trump Presidency.Are you from Waikato but have not registered as an iwi member? You can now do this online. Registering with Waikato-Tainui enables us to ensure we can offer you and your whaanau the best services available.

Nau mai ki Waikato-Tainui

We need you to ensure your details along with the details of your whaanau are correct and up-to-date so we can keep you informed about services and information pertinent to you as a tribal member. If you are about to start a business or looking to grow, Waikato-Tainui offer a number of opportunities which are available to tribal members to learn more about business development and or supporting you to connect with others within the rohe in Aotearoa.

Invasion of the Waikato โ€” July to December. New Zealand Settlements Act. Government confiscated 1, acres. Kiingi Te Rata succeeds his father to become the fourth Maaori King. Government attempts military conscription in Waikato during World War I.

Te Arikinui Te Atairangikaahu succeeds her father to be the sixth and the longest-serving leader of the Kiingtanga. May we suggest? Nau mai ki Waikato-Tainui Kia tupu, kia hua, kia puaawai Stay well informed, prepared and uplifted during Alert Level 4. Reo Resources. Tertiary Education Grant. Driver license subsidy. Te Hookioi. Waikato-Tainui calls government to account on freshwater rights.

Ako Aotearoa

Mana Whakahaere. Rehita mai Register Are you from Waikato but have not registered as an iwi member? Register you and your whaanau now. Pakihi Hou New Business If you are about to start a business or looking to grow, Waikato-Tainui offer a number of opportunities which are available to tribal members to learn more about business development and or supporting you to connect with others within the rohe in Aotearoa. Read more.

Te Whakakitenga

Kia tupu, kia hua, kia puaawai waikatotainui. Te Hitori o Te Raupatu Timeline of significant events.Welcome to the Whakapapa Club Forums where you will find a wealth of information. You are free to browse the forums, but if you wish to comment or add requests, you must registerwhich is quick and easy and you can even use your Facebook Login. Once you have signed up and posted either a reply or a new post it will not appear in the forums until it has been approved โ€” this is to stop spam from appearing and keeping our Whakapapa Club Forums relavent for Whakapapa only.

If anyone knows the whakapa of Torerenuiarua I would be very intersted to hear from them. I live in Hamilton and wish to explore my Tainui side.

I was told by my partner's Aunty that Torere was a daughter of Hoturoa. Is this true? If anyone can shed some light on this that would be awesome.

Ka kite ano. Due to my not knowing how to use the computer properly, I haven't put in lines but Marama and Rongomaiteururangi are brother and sister and Te Whaaki and Kohepare are sisters of Te Roroku. There have been numerous marriages with Ngai Tai. To name but a few. Many lines from Haraawaka are found amongst Ngai Tai.

Kia Ora Te Paetahi, thanks very much for the whakapapa. My great-grandfather Hairama Haaweti gave a lot of eveidence in the Native Land Court case which disputed ownership of the Tunapahore block around Thats right, they were their daughters. I was told that after Kahukuramihiata left Apanui Mutu and was killed, he was very down. Te Roroku, who was the Ngai Tai leader at the time, told him to go to Torere and he would find himself two replacement wives. Sorry, after I posted my note, I saw that things had collapsed in.

To put things right, the left side of the whakapapa should read:. As a young man, my uncle told me that Torere was Hoturoa's daughter and was already an adult when the waka arrived. The waka was tied up to Te Punga o Tainui at Whangaparaoa.

te punga o tainui

A couple of things happened, firstly, she got her mate and secondly, she was being sexually harassed by one of the chiefs of the waka. The result was she left the waka at Whangaparaoa and made her way overland and settled at Torere where she lived out her days.

te punga o tainui

Her great great grandson, Tai, was the eponymous ancestor of Ngai Tai at Torere. I understand that some of the Torere people migrated to Hauraki and intermarried with the Ngai Tai up there.

The links between the two branches was maintained over the years, thus one the Maxwell's from Clevedon married into Torere and we have a branch there. The Torere branch married into Ngati Porou and we have a branch there.


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